Wednesday, November 11, 2015

Studios on the Park, 11-7-15, Part 2

"Future Past" by Josh Talbott, photo by B. Radisavljevic
"Future Past" by Josh Talbott
I often just visit the studios of the artists I've met when I drop in at Studios on the Park. Since there were several exhibits going on Saturday, though, I got a chance to see work by artists I hadn't seen before. My big discovery on Saturday was Josh Talbott. His work was on display along with that of Lena Rushing, in the exhibit "Layers" in the Studio 4 Gallery. This exhibit will remain until December 27. The painting in this photo is entitled "Future Past." It makes me remember a time when we did not have sports cars and mountain bikes. Click this or any  photo to enlarge it.

"Roses Painted Red" and "Pieces of the World," photo taken by B. Radisavljevic
One technique I love is the way Josh uses sheets of music as backgrounds for some of his paintings. These are an example. The titles are "Roses Painted Red" and "Pieces of the World." Both are painted with acrylic on a canvas/collage, as is "Future Past" above.

One of his paintings I liked best I did not see in this exhibit. I found it, and the story behind it, equally beautiful, on his website. Go there to see this hummingbird painting "Tempo" and how it happened to be painted.

Lena Rushing had some interesting shadow boxes I had not seen before, but they were too difficult to photograph to include here. I didn't see them on her website either, but many of her paintings are there, and you will get a feel for her style if you go there. Her website also has the announcements of other exhibits where her work will be displayed for the rest of this year.


The Collage Workbook: How to Get Started and Stay Inspired

Most of us yearn to be creative, but not all of us can draw or paint. Sometimes, though, we can use found materials, photos, and pieces of our lives we want to remember, to make something beautiful. Perhaps it will be a collage of memories. It might be a memory or shadow box to give a loved one. Why not turn off the TV and build some memories into a concrete form to pass on to your family?